Draft, share, decide

Starting principles

Therefore

  1. Have a first meeting, with a core subset of participants, to create the first draft of the decision. Participants should primarily be selected based on who has the most context to contribute but also based on who’s interested in participating. Specifically, anyone who joins is expected to actively contribute.
  2. Share the draft with all relevant participants to gather feedback and adjust as necessary. This can be a large group meeting or a shared artifact depending on group preferences.
  3. Decide by consent.

Further adjustments

If you notice that there are a lot of objections after sharing the draft decision, this is an indication that you’re not including the right people to start.

If you notice that there are no meaningful comments after sharing the draft decision, consider reducing the number of people involved in the initial draft to increase speed.

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Staff Agile Coach at Spotify, ex-ThoughtWorks, ex-CruiseControl

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Jason Yip

Jason Yip

Staff Agile Coach at Spotify, ex-ThoughtWorks, ex-CruiseControl

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